IELTS Listening Practice Test
Bird Migration Theory

Most birds are believed to migrate seasonally.



Hibernation theory

  • It was believed that birds hibernated underwater or buried themselves in

    1

    mud
    .

  • This theory was later disproved by experiments on caged birds.



Transmutation theory

  • Aristotle believed birds changed from one species into another in summer and winter.

- In autumn he observed that redstarts experience the loss of

2

feathers
 and thought they then turned into robins.

- Aristotle's assumptions were logical because the two species of birds had a similar

3

shape
.



17th century

  • Charles Morton popularised the idea that birds fly to the

    4

    moon
     in winter.



Scientific developments

  • In 1822, a stork was killed in Germany which had an African spear in its

    5

    neck
    .

- previously there had been no

6

evidence
 that storks migrate to Africa

  • Little was known about the

    7

    destinations
     and journeys of migrating birds until the practice of ringing was established.

- It was thought large birds carried small birds on some journeys because they were considered incapable of travelling across huge

8

oceans
.

- Ringing depended on what is called the ‘

9

recovery
’ of dead birds.

  • In 1931, the first

    10

    atlas
     to show the migration of European birds was printed.

ĐÁP ÁN & GIẢI THÍCH CÂU 1

Giải thích chi tiết

smiley5Đối với dạng bài Summary Completion, cần phải xác định dạng từ --> điền 1 noun

smiley5Nghe thấy Take hibernation theory for example --> biết sắp đến câu trả lời nhờ vào subheading

checkNghe tiếp  Another theory for the regular appearance and disappearance of birds was that they spend winter hidden in mud

-->Những con chim này dành cả mùa đông trốn trong bùn (mud). hidden in mud = buried themselves in mud

--> điền mud

Lưu ý
  • Nội dung giải thích được viết bởi DOL IELTS Đình Lực - Học Viện Tiếng Anh Tư Duy đầu tiên tại Việt Nam
  • Đề được viết bởi nhà xuất bản lớn gồm Cambridge và Oxford